remand


remand
re|mand1 [ rı`mænd ] verb transitive usually passive LEGAL
to tell someone who has committed a crime to return to court for trial on a particular day:
be remanded in custody (=kept in prison until your trial): All five men were remanded in custody until Wednesday.
a. to send a legal case back to a lower court with instructions about what should be done
remand
re|mand 2 [ rı`mænd ] noun uncount LEGAL
the period of time that an accused person waits for their trial:
young men on remand for drug-related offenses
a. only before noun relating to someone who is on remand or to the process of being on remand

Usage of the words and phrases in modern English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • remand — re·mand 1 /ri mand/ vb [Anglo French remander, from Middle French, to order back, from Late Latin remandare to send back word, from Latin re back + mandare to order] vt 1: to return (a case or matter) from one court to another esp. lower court or …   Law dictionary

  • Remand — is a legal term which has two related but distinct usages. Its etymology is from the Latin re and mandare , literally to order. It evolved in Late Latin to remandare , or to send back word. It appears in Middle French as remander and in Middle… …   Wikipedia

  • Remand — Re*mand (r? m?nd ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Remanded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Remanding}.] [F. remander to send word again, L. remandare; pref. re re + mandare to commit, order, send word. See {Mandate}.] To recommit; to send back. [1913 Webster] Remand… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Remand — Re*mand , n. The act of remanding; the order for recommitment. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • remand — (v.) mid 15c., from M.Fr. remander (12c.), from L.L. remandare to send back word, repeat a command, from L. re back + mandare to consign, order, commit to one s charge (see MANDATE (Cf. mandate)). Related: Remanded; remanding …   Etymology dictionary

  • remand — Law ► VERB ▪ place (a defendant) on bail or in custody, especially when a trial is adjourned. ► NOUN ▪ a committal to custody. ORIGIN Latin remandare commit again …   English terms dictionary

  • remand — [ri mand′] vt. [ME remaunden < OFr remander < LL remandare, to notify in return < L re , back + mandare, to order: see MANDATE] 1. to send back; order to go back 2. Law a) to send (a prisoner or accused person) back into custody, as to… …   English World dictionary

  • remand — I UK [rɪˈmɑːnd] / US [rɪˈmænd] verb [transitive, usually passive] Word forms remand : present tense I/you/we/they remand he/she/it remands present participle remanding past tense remanded past participle remanded legal to tell someone who has… …   English dictionary

  • remand — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun VERB + REMAND ▪ be held on ▪ He was held on remand, charged with causing malicious damage to property. REMAND + NOUN ▪ centre, home (both BrE) ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • remand — re|mand1 [rıˈma:nd US rıˈmænd] v [T usually passive] law [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: remander, from Late Latin remandare to send back word , from Latin mandare; MANDATE1] 1.) BrE to send someone back from a court of law, to wait for… …   Dictionary of contemporary English


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